September 2nd, 2014
Mrs. Bill Daniels, Panther, McDowell County, WV  1946

Mrs. Bill Daniels, wife of a miner, canning pears. Panther Red Ash Coal Corporation, Douglas Mine, Panther, McDowell County, West Virginia.

Department of the Interior. Solid Fuels Administration For War. (04/19/1943 - 06/30/1947)

8/26/1946

via https://dayone.me/KuRz2O

Mrs. Bill Daniels, Panther, McDowell County, WV 1946

Mrs. Bill Daniels, wife of a miner, canning pears. Panther Red Ash Coal Corporation, Douglas Mine, Panther, McDowell County, West Virginia.

Department of the Interior. Solid Fuels Administration For War. (04/19/1943 - 06/30/1947)

8/26/1946

via https://dayone.me/KuRz2O

No. 9183

Honorary hunting and fishing privileges in WEST VIRGINIA

are hereby extended with pleasure to resident senior citizen

Paris Mitchem

Birth Date  March 3, 1902

This was my grandfather’s license.

via https://dayone.me/KoPzSs

No. 9183

Honorary hunting and fishing privileges in WEST VIRGINIA

are hereby extended with pleasure to resident senior citizen

Paris Mitchem

Birth Date March 3, 1902

This was my grandfather’s license.

via https://dayone.me/KoPzSs

September 1st, 2014
Lois Barksdale, 1946, Gary, McDowell County, WV

Lois, daughter of B. H. Barksdale, section foreman in mines, scrubs the front porch of their home. U.S. Coal and Coke Company, Gary Mines, Gary, McDowell County, West Virginia.

Department of the Interior. Solid Fuels Administration For War. (04/19/1943 - 06/30/1947)

8/17/1946

via https://dayone.me/Khxzwj

Lois Barksdale, 1946, Gary, McDowell County, WV

Lois, daughter of B. H. Barksdale, section foreman in mines, scrubs the front porch of their home. U.S. Coal and Coke Company, Gary Mines, Gary, McDowell County, West Virginia.

Department of the Interior. Solid Fuels Administration For War. (04/19/1943 - 06/30/1947)

8/17/1946

via https://dayone.me/Khxzwj

August 29th, 2014
Appalachian Morning

via https://dayone.me/Jwrzbg

Appalachian Morning

via https://dayone.me/Jwrzbg

August 26th, 2014

2 Corinthians 3:3

"Forasmuch as ye are manifestly declared to be the epistle of Christ ministered by us, written not with ink, but with the Spirit of the living God; not in tables of stone, but in fleshy tables of the heart." KJV

via https://dayone.me/J2Lzwu

Company Store Meat Counter, Gary, WV

Miners and families at the meat counter in subsidiary company store. Store has ample, clean refrigerated space. The meat department was clean. U.S. Coal and Coke Company, Gary Mines, Gary, McDowell County, West Virginia.

Department of the Interior. Solid Fuels Administration For War. (04/19/1943 - 06/30/1947)

8/16/1946

Photographer:  Russell Lee

via https://dayone.me/J1Xzg1

Company Store Meat Counter, Gary, WV

Miners and families at the meat counter in subsidiary company store. Store has ample, clean refrigerated space. The meat department was clean. U.S. Coal and Coke Company, Gary Mines, Gary, McDowell County, West Virginia.

Department of the Interior. Solid Fuels Administration For War. (04/19/1943 - 06/30/1947)

8/16/1946

Photographer: Russell Lee

via https://dayone.me/J1Xzg1

August 25th, 2014
Coal Miners Visit

Miners visit near the company store. Gilliam Coal and Coke Company, Gilliam Mine, Gilliam, McDowell County, West Virginia.

Department of the Interior. Solid Fuels Administration For War. (04/19/1943 - 06/30/1947)

8/13/1946

Photographer:  Russell Lee

via https://dayone.me/IRlzTT

Coal Miners Visit

Miners visit near the company store. Gilliam Coal and Coke Company, Gilliam Mine, Gilliam, McDowell County, West Virginia.

Department of the Interior. Solid Fuels Administration For War. (04/19/1943 - 06/30/1947)

8/13/1946

Photographer: Russell Lee

via https://dayone.me/IRlzTT

August 24th, 2014
Coal miner (Polish) — Capels, McDowell County, West Virginia

1938

Library of Congress, Farm Security Administration - Office of War Information Photograph

Photographer:  Marion Post Wolcott

via https://dayone.me/ICIzNV

Coal miner (Polish) — Capels, McDowell County, West Virginia

1938

Library of Congress, Farm Security Administration - Office of War Information Photograph

Photographer: Marion Post Wolcott

via https://dayone.me/ICIzNV

August 20th, 2014
                                      The Winds of Change

As I stood near the old, wooden train trestle in Jenkinjones, I was thinking how I wanted to compose my photograph. I wanted to capture as much of it as I could in one shot. My hair whipped around my face as I attached my camera to the tripod. Although my camera was securely attached to the tripod, I hesitated to the let go due to the strength of the wind. As I stood there, the wind blew one good time, and…..

Seemed to carry me into the past. I looked through the trestle and saw more houses up the hollow than what was there a minute ago. I looked behind me and saw houses everywhere! I saw children playing in the dirt road and yards as the wind carried their laughs and giggles to my ears. I heard their mommas calling them to come in for dinner and children asking “When is daddy going to be home?” I realized as I watched this close-knit neighborhood how so many winds have blown across our beloved county.

The wind blew up a demand for coal. Due to the United States growing at a rapid pace, the need for steel making coal was in high demand. We had that coal and our country needed it. We, as Americans, depended on coal to prosper, to secure our position as a strong nation, to protect our freedoms. Those who were here couldn’t mine the coal quick enough to keep up with the demand. We needed more people to swing a pick and shovel.

The wind blew in many people of different nationalities to McDowell County. Jewish, Italian, English, Polish, Russian, Hungarian, Greek, and many others were now home in McDowell County. They had come to America, the land of opportunity and freedom. They chose McDowell County as it was growing and had numerous opportunities for employment. Although language barriers made communication difficult at times, there was one thing that was common and known to all. Hard work.

As the wind had blown in the people, the wind seemed to pick up businesses, churches and homes and construct them across the land. Ten municipalities were built with the strength of one hundred thousand souls. Businesses of all varieties boomed. At least three churches of different denominations were in every community. Homes of all different shapes and sizes were near the river, near the road, on the mountain sides, on the streets.

The wind had blown coal dust into all our veins. Every aspect of our lives revolved around coal. While many of our fathers worked in the mines, those who didn’t still depended on the miners. The bakers, the cooks, the construction workers, the pharmacists, the bankers, the preachers, and many other professionals were all dependent on that black rock.

As the wind blew colder, I thought of the many churches and old buildings that I have photographed in the county that are now one hundred years old, or older. Many, such as the Flat Iron Drug Store, Sacred Heart Catholic Church of Powhatan, and our beloved courthouse are still in use today. However, many have fallen into disrepair.

All of a sudden I heard a whistle and I jumped. Above me, I saw an old steam engine slowing moving, building up steam to pull that load. I realized what an awesome shot I could get. I quickly recomposed my shot. As the wind blew, I clicked the shutter and I thought of the various dilapidated historic sites around our county and how the wind was blowing them away. Those footprints are disappearing day by day. I quickly looked at my LCD screen to see my shot. There was the old, empty trestle silhouetted against the cloudy sky.

via https://dayone.me/HNBzTY

                                      The Winds of Change

As I stood near the old, wooden train trestle in Jenkinjones, I was thinking how I wanted to compose my photograph. I wanted to capture as much of it as I could in one shot. My hair whipped around my face as I attached my camera to the tripod. Although my camera was securely attached to the tripod, I hesitated to the let go due to the strength of the wind. As I stood there, the wind blew one good time, and…..

Seemed to carry me into the past. I looked through the trestle and saw more houses up the hollow than what was there a minute ago. I looked behind me and saw houses everywhere! I saw children playing in the dirt road and yards as the wind carried their laughs and giggles to my ears. I heard their mommas calling them to come in for dinner and children asking “When is daddy going to be home?” I realized as I watched this close-knit neighborhood how so many winds have blown across our beloved county.

The wind blew up a demand for coal. Due to the United States growing at a rapid pace, the need for steel making coal was in high demand. We had that coal and our country needed it. We, as Americans, depended on coal to prosper, to secure our position as a strong nation, to protect our freedoms. Those who were here couldn’t mine the coal quick enough to keep up with the demand. We needed more people to swing a pick and shovel.

The wind blew in many people of different nationalities to McDowell County. Jewish, Italian, English, Polish, Russian, Hungarian, Greek, and many others were now home in McDowell County. They had come to America, the land of opportunity and freedom. They chose McDowell County as it was growing and had numerous opportunities for employment. Although language barriers made communication difficult at times, there was one thing that was common and known to all. Hard work.

As the wind had blown in the people, the wind seemed to pick up businesses, churches and homes and construct them across the land. Ten municipalities were built with the strength of one hundred thousand souls. Businesses of all varieties boomed. At least three churches of different denominations were in every community. Homes of all different shapes and sizes were near the river, near the road, on the mountain sides, on the streets.

The wind had blown coal dust into all our veins. Every aspect of our lives revolved around coal. While many of our fathers worked in the mines, those who didn’t still depended on the miners. The bakers, the cooks, the construction workers, the pharmacists, the bankers, the preachers, and many other professionals were all dependent on that black rock.

As the wind blew colder, I thought of the many churches and old buildings that I have photographed in the county that are now one hundred years old, or older. Many, such as the Flat Iron Drug Store, Sacred Heart Catholic Church of Powhatan, and our beloved courthouse are still in use today. However, many have fallen into disrepair.

All of a sudden I heard a whistle and I jumped. Above me, I saw an old steam engine slowing moving, building up steam to pull that load. I realized what an awesome shot I could get. I quickly recomposed my shot. As the wind blew, I clicked the shutter and I thought of the various dilapidated historic sites around our county and how the wind was blowing them away. Those footprints are disappearing day by day. I quickly looked at my LCD screen to see my shot. There was the old, empty trestle silhouetted against the cloudy sky.

via https://dayone.me/HNBzTY

July 29th, 2014
Filbert, McDowell County, WV Post Office 1946

Post office for the Filbert mine area. U.S. Coal and Coke Company, Gary Mines, Gary, McDowell County, West Virginia.

Department of the Interior. Solid Fuels Administration For War. (04/19/1943 - 06/30/1947)

8/17/1946

Photographer:  Russell Lee

via https://dayone.me/Bp7zlO

Filbert, McDowell County, WV Post Office 1946

Post office for the Filbert mine area. U.S. Coal and Coke Company, Gary Mines, Gary, McDowell County, West Virginia.

Department of the Interior. Solid Fuels Administration For War. (04/19/1943 - 06/30/1947)

8/17/1946

Photographer: Russell Lee

via https://dayone.me/Bp7zlO